Latest In

News

Datadog Ansible - Automating Monitoring

As more and more organizations adopt DevOps practices, the need for automation in infrastructure management is becoming increasingly important. One of the most popular tools for infrastructure automation is Datadog Ansible, which is widely used for configuration management, application deployment, and orchestration.

Kelvin Farr
Apr 11, 202320 Shares1016 Views
As more and more organizations adopt DevOps practices, the need for automation in infrastructure management is becoming increasingly important. One of the most popular tools for infrastructure automation is Datadog Ansible, which is widely used for configuration management, application deployment, and orchestration.
Another important aspect of modern infrastructure management is monitoring, and this is where Datadog comes in. Datadog is a cloud-based monitoring platform that provides real-time visibility into the health and performance of an organization's infrastructure, applications, and services.

What Is Datadog Ansible?

Datadog Ansible is a collection of Ansible modules that enable users to easily integrate Datadog monitoring into their infrastructure automation workflows. These modules provide a simple and consistent interface for interacting with the Datadog API, allowing users to perform a variety of monitoring-related tasks, such as creating monitors, querying metrics, and sending notifications.

Getting Started With Datadog Ansible

Before we can start using Datadog Ansible, we need to set up our environment. The first step is to install Ansible on our local machine or on a remote server. Ansible can be installed on a variety of operating systems, including Linux, macOS, and Windows. Once Ansible is installed, we need to install the Datadog Ansible modules. This can be done using the following command:
$ ansible-galaxy collection install datadog.datadog
This command installs the Datadog Ansible modules from the Ansible Galaxy repository. Once the modules are installed, we can start using them in our Ansible playbooks.

Creating Datadog Monitors With Ansible

One of the most common tasks in monitoring infrastructure is creating monitors. A monitor is a check that runs on a regular basis to ensure that a specific aspect of the infrastructure is working correctly. Monitors can be created for a variety of purposes, such as checking the status of a server, monitoring a specific metric, or ensuring that a service is available.
Creating a monitor with Datadog Ansible is a simple process. We can use the datadog_monitor module to create a monitor by specifying the monitor's name, type, query, and options. For example, to create a monitor that checks the CPU usage of a server, we can use the following Ansible task:
  • - name: Create CPU usage monitor
  • datadog_monitor:
  • name: "CPU usage"
  • type: metric alert
  • query: avg:system.cpu.usage{*} by {host} > 80
  • options:
  • notify_no_data: true
  • no_data_timeframe: 10
  • evaluation_delay: 5
In this example, we are creating a monitor named "CPU usage" that checks the average CPU usage of all servers. The monitor will trigger an alert if the CPU usage is above 80%. We are also specifying some options for the monitor, such as the notification settings and the evaluation delay.
Black Colored A In A Circle
Black Colored A In A Circle

Querying Metrics With Datadog Ansible

In addition to creating monitors, we can also use Datadog Ansible to query metrics from Datadog. Metrics are numerical data points that can be used to monitor the health and performance of infrastructure and applications. By querying metrics with Datadog Ansible, we can extract useful information about our infrastructure and use it to make informed decisions.
To query metrics with Datadog Ansible, we can use the datadog_query module. This module allows us to specify a query to retrieve metrics from Datadog. For example, to retrieve the average CPU usage across all servers, we can use the following Ansible task:
  • - name: Query CPU usage metric
  • datadog_query:
  • query: avg:system.cpu.usage{*} by {host}
  • register: cpu_usage
In this example, we are querying the 'system.cpu.usage' metric for all hosts, and storing the result in the 'cpu_usage' variable. We can then use this variable in subsequent tasks to perform further processing or to send notifications.

Sending Notifications With Datadog Ansible

Notifications are an important aspect of monitoring, as they allow us to quickly respond to issues and take corrective action. Datadog Ansible provides several modules that allow us to send notifications to various endpoints, such as email, Slack, or PagerDuty.
To send a notification with Datadog Ansible, we can use the appropriate module for the endpoint we want to notify. For example, to send an email notification when a monitor triggers, we can use the datadog_event module with the email notification type:
  • - name: Send email notification
  • datadog_event:
  • title: "Monitor triggered"
  • text: "The CPU usage monitor has triggered"
  • tags:
  • - "cpu_usage"
  • priority: normal
  • alert_type: error
  • notify_no_data: true
  • notification_type: email
  • recipients:
  • - "email@example.com"
In this example, we are sending an email notification when a monitor triggers. We are specifying the title and text of the notification, as well as some additional options such as tags, priority, and alert type. We are also specifying the notification type as email, and the recipients of the notification.
Video unavailable
This video is unavailable

Automating Monitoring With Datadog Ansible

Now that we have seen how to perform some basic monitoring tasks with Datadog Ansible, let's take a look at how we can automate these tasks using Ansible playbooks. Ansible playbooks are YAML files that define a set of tasks to be performed on a target system. By combining the Datadog Ansible modules with Ansible playbooks, we can create powerful automation workflows for monitoring our infrastructure.
For example, let's say we want to create a playbook that sets up monitoring for a new server. We can use the following playbook:
  • - name: Set up monitoring for new server
  • hosts: new_server
  • tasks:
  • - name: Create CPU usage monitor
  • datadog_monitor:
  • name: "CPU usage"
  • type: metric alert
  • query: avg:system.cpu.usage{*} by {host} > 80
  • options:
  • notify_no_data: true
  • no_data_timeframe: 10
  • evaluation_delay: 5
  • - name: Query CPU usage metric
  • datadog_query:
  • query: avg:system.cpu.usage{*} by {host}
  • register: cpu_usage
  • - name: Send email notification
  • datadog_event:
  • title: "Monitor triggered"
  • text: "The CPU usage monitor has triggered"
  • tags:
  • - "cpu_usage"
  • priority: normal
  • alert_type: error
  • notify_no_data: true
  • notification_type: email
  • recipients:
  • - "email@example.com"
In this playbook, we are creating a monitor for CPU usage, querying the CPU usage metric, and sending an email notification if the monitor triggers. We are targeting a host named "new_server", and performing these tasks on that host.
We can also use Ansible roles to create reusable sets of tasks for monitoring different types of infrastructure. For example, we could create a role for monitoring web servers that include tasks for monitoring CPU usage, memory usage, and response time. We could then apply this role to all of our web servers, ensuring that they are all monitored in the same way.

Best Practices For Using Datadog Ansible

When using Datadog Ansible, there are several best practices that we should follow to ensure that our monitoring is effective and efficient.

Use Tags To Organize Monitors And Events

Tags are a powerful way to organize and filter monitors and events in Datadog. By using consistent tags across all of our monitors and events, we can easily search and filter them based on various criteria, such as host, environment, or application.
For example, we could use the following tags to organize our monitors and events:
  • env:production- Indicates that the monitor or event is related to the production environment.
  • app:web- Indicates that the monitor or event is related to the web application.
  • host:web-1- Indicates that the monitor or event is related to the web server with hostname "web-1".
By using consistent tags across all of our monitors and events, we can easily search and filter them based on these criteria, as well as create dashboards and alerts based on them.

Use Monitors To Detect Problems Before They Occur

One of the key benefits of using Datadog for monitoring is its ability to detect problems before they occur. By setting up monitors for critical metrics, such as CPU usage or memory usage, we can detect when these metrics exceed a certain threshold and take corrective action before they cause downtime or other issues.
When setting up monitors, it is important to define clear thresholds and alert criteria. For example, we might define a monitor for CPU usage with the following criteria:
  • Name:"CPU Usage"
  • Query:avg:system.cpu.usage{*} by {host} > 80
  • Evaluation Window:Last 5 minutes
  • Notification Criteria:Alert when any of the following conditions are met:
By defining clear thresholds and alert criteria, we can ensure that we are alerted when there is a problem with our infrastructure and that we take corrective action in a timely manner.

People Also Ask

Can Datadog Ansible Be Used For Container Monitoring?

Yes, Datadog Ansible can be used for container monitoring by integrating with container orchestration tools like Kubernetes and Docker Swarm.

Does Datadog Ansible Provide Support For Log Monitoring?

Yes, Datadog Ansible provides support for log monitoring by integrating with popular logging tools like Elasticsearch and Splunk.

Can Datadog Ansible Be Used For Application Monitoring?

Yes, Datadog Ansible can be used for application monitoring by defining custom metrics and checks for specific applications or services.

How Does Datadog Ansible Handle Security And Compliance Concerns?

Datadog Ansible provides a range of security and compliance features, including role-based access control and integration with tools like HashiCorp Vault.

What Kind Of Training Or Support Is Available For Datadog Ansible?

Datadog offers a range of training and support options for Datadog Ansible, including online courses, documentation, and customer support.

Conclusion

Datadog Ansible is a powerful tool that can help us ensure the health and reliability of our infrastructure, while also allowing us to optimize its performance and respond quickly to issues as they arise.
By following best practices and using the full capabilities of Datadog Ansible, we can create a monitoring system that provides us with the insights we need to succeed in today's fast-paced and demanding technology landscape.
Jump to
Latest Articles
Popular Articles