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Shippers Urged To Avoid Red Sea After US Merchant Vessel Attack

In the realm of international affairs, recent events have once again underscored the delicate balance and potential risks that govern global maritime trade. Shippers urged to avoid Red Sea after US merchant vessel attack.

Cecilia Jones
Jan 17, 20243 Shares2896 Views
In the realm of international affairs, recent events have once again underscored the delicate balance and potential risks that govern global maritime trade. Shippers urged to avoid Red Sea after US merchant vessel attack.
For weeks, the Houthis have been deploying missiles and drones carrying explosives on commercial vessels in the Red Sea. They justify their action as a just reaction to Israel's ongoing conflict with Hamas, a militant resistance Palestinian organization, in the Gaza Strip.
Shippers urged to avoid Red Sea after US merchant vessel attack. The use of an anti-ship ballistic missile by Houthi militants on a US-owned commercial vessel on Monday highlighted concerns that the world's most significant trade route is still too dangerous to use.
US Central Command reported on X that the Gibraltar Eagle, flying the Marshall Islands flag, was hit in the Gulf of Aden at approximately 4 p.m. local time. The ship escaped serious damage, no one was hurt, and it carried on with its journey.
The strike confirms US warnings that ships should avoid the Red Sea, as reported by a leading industry trade group. Additionally, on Monday, the Department of Transportation warned US merchant ships to stay away from the area until further notice.
The most recent assaults on commercial vessels occurred one day after CENTCOMdeclared that it had intercepted an anti-ship cruise missile fired by the Houthis in the direction of the USS Laboon, an American cruiser operating in the Red Sea.
After months of Houthi attacks on commercial ships, which targeted any vessel having any sort of relation to Israel, US and UK forces blasted targets in Yemen during the past few days.
President Biden made the announcement of the United States and its allies' strikes against the Houthis on Thursday night. Just on Friday, bombs and missiles fired from the air and sea were directed towards 28 different Houthi targets. Over the weekend, more strikes were carried out; on Saturday, American soldiers targeted a Houthi radar facility.
The Houthis accepted credit for the strike, and in a televised statement, Yahya Saree, a spokesman for the Houthi armed forces, declared that they would target warships and vessels from the US and the UK. According to him, the strikes would go on as long as Israel carries out its offensive in Gaza.
Israel launched it deadliest attack on Gaza in October, killing thousands of civialians, children, anad women. It's been more than 100 days since this genocide of Gazans. People all around the world are protesting all day and all night, but there is not betterment. Then, Yemen did what was needed to be done, cutting down Israel and its allies financial strings.
Before leaving the region, Eagle Bulk Shipping, the Gibraltar Eagle's operator, stated the ship had been struck by a projectile and that a cargo hold had suffered some minor damage. It carried goods made of steel.
The largest international maritime association in the world, Bimco, posted a navigation warning, citing guidance from the US Naval Forces Central Command. It issued a warning that the present unrest might continue for "some time."
The trade association stated:
Coalition forces and Bimco continue to recommend shipping companies to consider avoiding shipping operations in the area.
Though early indications indicated the pause might only last for three days, the maritime industry had already received a warning on Friday to avoid the area. The Department of Transportation's own 72-hour warning, which was extended to an indefinite one on Monday, echoed that. It was issued on Friday.
Because ships are being forced to cruise thousands of miles further around Africa to avoid the area, the attacks are increasing shipping expenses. This has created the possibility of another inflation wave and caused delays in the delivery of manufactured items as well as commodities.
Several shipowners have followed the warnings, but gas tankers from Qatar are among the most recent boats that appear to have been forced the hard way. Events like these often raise geopolitical concerns.

Conclusion

Shippers urged to avoid Red Sea after US merchant vessel attack. As the global community navigates these turbulent waters, the incident involving a US Merchant Vessel in the Red Sea serves as a stark reminder of the interconnectedness of geopolitics and maritime security.
The imperative for shippers to exercise prudence and avoid the Red Sea underscores the tangible risks that geopolitical conflicts pose to the smooth operation of international trade routes.
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