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South Korea Faces A New Wave Of Young Criminals

South Korea faces a new wave of young criminals, as authorities have intensified their efforts to combat organized crime in recent months, revealing that a significant portion of those apprehended belong to the Gen Z and millennial demographics.

Hilda Workman
Dec 25, 20233512 Shares76341 Views
South Korea faces a new wave of young criminals, as authorities have intensified their efforts to combat organized crime in recent months, revealing that a significant portion of those apprehended belong to the Gen Z and millennial demographics.
The National Police Agency (NPA) of South Korea disclosed on Wednesday that 1,183 individuals associated with organized crime rings were arrested nationwide between August 7 and December 16, as reported by The Korea Herald.
A total of 888 individuals were recognized as "MZ gangsters" between the ages of 30 and younger. Sources inside law enforcement have observed a change in the kind of crimes committed by younger individuals in comparison to those perpetrated by older generations. This shift has brought to light the prevalence of online gambling, scams, and fraud.
The police reported that almost 40% of the charges were related to "intricate/business-type illegal activities," such as operating online gambling platforms, while slightly over 21% were linked to extortion and violence.
During a workshop aimed at assisting prosecutors handling these cases, participants were informed that MZ gangsters "collaborate based on profit rather than traditional factional affiliations," according to The Times.
"There is a need for authorities to re-establish the meaning of organized crime rings, and find ways to respond to such crimes," the workshop was told.
An NPA spokesperson informed The Times that the agency is committed to "strengthen the gang crackdown system to establish a more effective crime response system and focus our investigative capabilities on various forms of organized crime centered on MZ generation gangsters."
The Organized Crime Index, which assesses global organized crime, highlights South Korea's ongoing efforts to eliminate "all mafia-style groups" since the 1990s, noting that the remaining organizations are small and lack territorial control or significant involvement in intensive violence.

Conclusion

The index also emphasizes the significant role that foreign crime syndicates play in the country's criminal markets, with mainland Chinese Triads, Japanese Yakuza, and Russian mafia gangs actively participating.
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