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Sudanese Left To Fend For Themselves As Foreign Nations Rescue Their Nationals

Sudanese left to fend for themselves as foreign nations rescue their nationals. Several foreign countries have been conducting rescue missions in Sudan to evacuate embassy staff and nationals amid the deadly fighting between the country's army and a paramilitary group.

Hilda Workman
Apr 23, 2023228 Shares3040 Views
Sudanese left to fend for themselves as foreign nations rescue their nationals. Several foreign countries have been conducting rescue missions in Sudan to evacuate embassy staff and nationals amid the deadly fighting between the country's army and a paramilitary group.
The United Kingdom has already withdrawn its diplomatic staff from the country, and the US military helped evacuate around 100 embassy staff and other foreign diplomatic professionals to safety.
Other countries, such as France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, Germany, and Jordan, have also carried out similar operations. Meanwhile, the situation in Sudan remains dire, with over 420 people killed, 3,700 injured, and many left stranded without food, water, or medical services.
The humanitarian crisis has been worsened by the closure of the country's main airport, leaving many Sudanese civilians trapped or struggling to find ways to leave via the land borders.
The situation in Sudan remains tense and volatile as the fighting between the army and the Rapid Support Forces continues. The conflict began when General Abdul Fattah al-Burhan and Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan seized power in a coup in 2021, and tensions between the two factions escalated, leading to the current fighting.
The international community has expressed its concern and condemnation of the violence, with many countries calling for an end to the hostilities and a return to a peaceful transition of power to a civilian government. The United Nations has also called for an immediate cessation of hostilities and for all parties to prioritize the protection of civilians.
The humanitarian situation on the ground is worsening, with many people stranded without access to basic necessities such as food, water, and medical care. The closure of the main airport has also made it difficult for aid agencies to deliver supplies and provide assistance to those in need.
The evacuation of foreign nationals and embassy staff is a priority for many countries, but the situation on the ground is making it challenging to carry out these operations safely. The recent attacks on French and Egyptian evacuation convoys have highlighted the risks involved in these operations.
For several days, Isma'il Kushkush, a Sudanese-American journalist residing in Khartoum, was among 29 individuals, including foreign nationals and children, who were trapped inside a building located near the presidential palace in downtown Khartoum.
According to several text messages he sent to CNN, he said:
No power or water for five days. Using little water remaining in water tank. Running out of food rations. Unable to leave the building which is located two blocks from the presidential palace. Epicenter of the fighting since the conflict began.- Isma'il Kushkush, a Sudanese-American journalist residing in Khartoum

[Latest]Foreign powers rescue nationals while Sudanese must fend for themselves

The situation in Sudan is complex and rapidly evolving, with clashes continuing between the army and the paramilitary group, and both sides blaming each other for the violence. The international community has been calling for an end to the fighting and for a peaceful transition to a civilian government, but the situation on the ground remains unstable.
For security reasons, a woman in her thirties who wished to remain anonymous told CNN that she managed to escape from Khartoum to Egypt by bus. She said that the unpredictability of the RSF and deteriorating conditions in the capital prompted her to leave. Although her family had a generator and could provide water to homes in their area, it was uncertain how long they could continue to do so or when the conflict might bring violence to their doorstep.
The woman explained, "We had to decide whether to stay and risk starvation or be killed by a stray bullet... We ultimately chose to take the risk." She added that she had heard of people dying in their homes due to a lack of food and water. "We just figured we were sitting ducks sheltering in our houses."
She and her relatives, including two babies and an elderly woman with a serious medical condition, found a bus driver who was willing to take them to Egypt. They left on Friday morning and arrived at the border on Saturday evening, with only one stop by Sudan's armed forces in Omdurman. However, they encountered difficulties getting men without visas into Egypt, and a few people without passports, including newborn babies, were not allowed to enter.
"They had to be left behind. And we're still trying to work out how to get them the necessary paperwork to cross the border," she said.

Conclusion

The international community must continue to work towards a peaceful resolution of the conflict in Sudan, and to provide aid to those in need. It is essential that all parties involved in the fighting agree to a ceasefire and work towards a peaceful transition to a civilian government, in order to prevent further loss of life and to ensure that the people of Sudan can begin to rebuild their country.
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